Philosophy of Make Overs

I’ve been a fan of make over shows ever since I was a little girl. Weird? Not at all; you might think: well, people tend to like that stuff, we are all taught to obsess about it in one way or another. We all want to be beautiful, and if there is an expert on beauty telling us exactly what we need to become the more beautiful versions of ourselves, then count us in. I hear you, but I beg that you put aside that cup of cynicism for the duration of this post and consider a lighter take on it.

Surely, beauty or handsomeness might not be everyone’s keyword. Many of us do not identify with those traits for a variety of reasons. But what if I told you that you (Ms. or Mr.) who don’t consider yourself a beacon of good looks can get there with a few tips.

DOES THIS PITCH SOUND FAMILIAR? Beauty marketers attempt this approach to get you to feel a little worse about yourself for a second, hence posing a problem and then handing you the solution in the form of a cream or an injection or a shade of dreamy midnight lipstick. I do not wish to go into the “f*cked upness” of that, but this is just an example of how we have commonly become cynical about our own beauty.

Beauty is on the inside, and it is reflected on our faces and bodies and actions. There is no doubt about that. With this said, I want to take you back to make over shows. Beauty makeovers are not about unattractive people becoming gorgeous, but about people with a lost physical identity who find it somewhere with the help of others. At the end of the day, to each his/her own, and no amount of words can come close to covering all the nuances that are brought forth by this topic. So stay here with me and understand that we are talking about one specific aspect which is physical appearance and its relation to identity and how we see ourselves.

Your hair, your face, and your body don’t define you; so that is not what I mean by physical identity. Physical identity in my dictionary is about how we choose to present our shapes and forms in ways that describe and tell stories about who we are. Those were my favorite moments in makeover shows. People who had disrupted connections with their faces, bodies and self presentation who suddenly were allowed to dig into that. It was beautiful to watch people uncover who they are by embracing the beauty that comes with them.

In our pursuit of selflessness and becoming better humans, we have to understand the importance of finding clear connections to our bodies and faces. You wake up feeling under the weather and slightly sick, don’t go and stare at the bags under your eyes and start finding reasons on why they are there and reliving the bothersome times that got you here. Self care indicates that we are gentler on our spirits and on our bodies, and if we take care of both then we maintain the balance. So on those bad days, maintain your care routine, moisturize and don’t hold your beauty as captive of the sickness. Treat yourself and put on something presentable and comfortable, something that signals to the world; I am healing; instead of I’m sick.

Play with the beauty you have and always remember we need that balance and we need the connection between our spirits and our bodies; and our thoughts will follow.

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