How Do Millennials Overcome the Generational Stereotype?

We are the generation of nostalgia, we are the gate keepers remembering what used to be and gazing towards what will become. It continues to be surreal how we are all trying to cope with the world within our reach.

We are the generation that played outside and disregarded scraped knees. We were fascinated with toys and with beautiful Disney stories. We had the balance; we knew what used to be before technology found a home in our pockets.

Funny enough we are the ones rushing to watch the remakes of our favorite childhood movies, we are the first in line waiting for amusement park rides, and we are apparently the childless couples who instead of honeymooning on remote islands, go to Disney Land to play with Mickey.

Our biggest problems with our superiors, parents and governments is that they cannot understand the duality of our generational identity. We are children at heart, and are trying to redefine adult life not for us only but for the generations that come after us. The younger ones that resemble their parents and grandparents with little to nothing. We are thrust into a world that does not realize where it is headed, lead by old men who cannot wrap their little dinosaur hands around the meager resources that remain. And so we leave our desk jobs, and we leave tradition. We try to fix what can be fixed and live with less. Minimalism and not growing any roots anywhere we go are symptoms of our modern economy. The generation that embraces meditation, yoga and clean eating, a generation that hopes to learn from others and include everyone.

Or at least that’s what we think we are.

Except, we are the generation that also voted for someone like Trump, and we are the generation that cannot deal with life without an AI sidekick. We are the generation that was so bored and lost that a lot of us fought in wars and still are included in wars, both real and virtual, way over our heads.

The point from this is that we can all wear rose colored glasses, and drink Chai Tea Lattes (which literally translates to tea tea by the way), we can avoid gluten at all costs and stop using plastic. We can go off the grid or count our followers until eternity. Nothing will help us except understanding that we are not a stand alone generation. We are not a separate kind of humans unlike any other.

We would love to boast and say that we are immensely different and that we will change the world. But, truth is every generation changes the world, and at any point there is an old lady and a little girl on opposite poles of the earth doing something incredible for humanity, and they don’t even have to speak English.

Understanding the value of the old and the opportunity dwelling in the new is a skill, one that many of us who champion our generation for being so unique disregard.

Well So What?

So what, if we remember how wonderful it used to be to have a technology free childhood? So what if we can afford to live so differently today than our parents could in their day? What can we learn from all that?

What can you learn from what you’ve known, and how can you transform it and bring something better to the table?

In short, only one deduction remains; the value of our generation must be our contribution, it must be the honing of new skills. We must learn to mediate between our memories and nostalgias and actively prepare a better tomorrow.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.